Expert shopping: Untucked men’s shirts

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With the line between working and working from home continuously blurring, untucked button-down shirts might be the new videoconferencing uniform. They’re comfortable and keep you from having to push shirt ends into your pants after reaching up or down, or otherwise stretching. And they achieve the traditional and professional look that’s become so typical of American working environments. Modern men’s shirts have been packing newer and ever more versatile materials, features and fabrics, giving you many options to consider and choices to make. For one, should you even consider going untucked with a button-down? One style expert certainly thinks so.

IN THIS ARTICLE

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Busy Shopping Scenes Only Part of the Picture

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Monday saw throngs of shoppers in England’s high streets, but it’s a stark reality from the distant supply chain workers and factory owners — many still holding out for payment from those same retailers, perhaps on declining hopes.

With stores permitted to reopen on Monday, lines gathered in locations like Oxford Circus outside Apple, Nike, Cos, Kiko and Zara. In another part of town, Westfield London in Hammersmith, teenagers sipped iced drinks and Primark bags, lounging in the sun.

Eager for sales and anything that didn’t resemble the confines of their living rooms, H&M, Zara, Apple and the clearance stalls at Foot Locker also drew pools of shoppers.

Despite Western retailers sliding up their gates and opening doors to shoppers, things are far from “normal” for apparel manufacturers in Bangladesh, which attributes 80 percent of its exports to the sector.

Even if a

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What will a Marks and Spencer shopping trip look like after lockdown?

You may have been visiting your local Marks and Spencer a lot during lockdown. Like all supermarkets, its near-600 food halls have remained open so that shoppers can pick up essential supplies like milk, bread and toilet paper.

If you had been after a multipack of socks or a pair of children’s shoes though, you’d have been out of luck, as all other departments have been closed to the public since lockdown began on 23rd March. Shopping online has proven to be a workable solution, but returns are a faff that many of us simply don’t have the time or inclination to deal with.

So news that non-essential shops can reopen from 15th June will come as welcome relief to many, and M&S is among the stores readying for that date. But a post-lockdown shopping trip will be markedly different from the experience we’ve come to know. 

Marks & Spencer

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Customer Data Reveals Shift in Peak Online Shopping Hours

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As consumers continued to stay at home during quarantine, in the last two weeks in April and the first two weeks in May 2020, Quibit looked across customer events, transactions, and visitor sessions in the U.S. and U.K. to gain insights on how people are shopping presently and how retailers can adjust.

With revenue per customer down across all verticals, Quibit writes in its report that there is a risk for smaller AOV becoming the “new normal” for online shoppers once stores re-open. Further, as revenue-per-converter is down across all sub-verticals and retail channels, the company says there are signs of consumers becoming thriftier in spending. This can be attributed, the report states, due to fears of job securing and disposable income.

“There’s no doubt in my mind that brands that have been able to pivot quickly are those that are going to

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